DIY Drugs

April 16th, 2012 | Posted by paul in DIY/Maker - (Comments Off on DIY Drugs)

From University of Glasgow:

A new 3D printing process developed at the University of Glasgow could revolutionise the way scientists, doctors and even the general public create chemical products.

Professor Lee Cronin, Gardiner Chair of Chemistry at the University, believes his research could lead to the development of home chemical fabricators which consumers could use to design and create medicine at home.

A new research paper, published in the journal Nature Chemistry, outlines how the process has been proven to work. Using a commercially-available 3D printer operated by open-source computer-aided design software, Professor Cronin and his team have built what they call ‘reactionware’, special vessels for chemical reactions which are made from a polymer gel which sets at room temperature.

By adding other chemicals to the gel deposited by the printer, the team have been able to make the vessel itself part of the reaction process. While this is common in large-scale chemical engineering, the development of reactionware makes it possible for the first time for custom vessels to be fabricated on a laboratory scale.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Shift From Consumers to Producers

January 7th, 2004 | Posted by paul in DIY/Maker - (0 Comments)

Doc Searls makes an interesting comment, one that I have believed would happen increasingly as cheaper, smarter, more user-friendly software hits the market. It’s becoming easier and cheaper for anyone, assuming their motivated, to create their own music, movies and news (blogs), etc. We are seeing a shift from the consumer being transformed into producers, and as Doc Searls says this means a freer, bigger, more diverse and healthy marketplace for all of us.

I predict that within the next decade, we’ll also start to see this same type of shift happen in the manufacturing center, with smaller groups and individuals become the chief innovators, empowered by desktop manufacturing as it gets cheaper and more sophisticated.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail